Cycling and walking route

img_1812Click on this link to find a map of a lovely cycling/walking route that takes you along the forest track, past the ruined village of Knockroy.

Knockroy township, Tiroran Forest

You can stop off to have a look at the Giant Heads and take a detour up to the viewing point.

06.16 Hanging Heads Tiroran (15)The route brings you back along the main road with beautiful vistas where the trees have been cleared.

Parking is at the main entrance to the forest.

Tiroran Community Forest is a working forest so please follow the forestry operation signs to ensure a safe visit.

Sea Eagle Picture Competition

The sea eagle sculpture that Tilhill Forestry kindly commissioned for Tiroran Community Forest this summer has made its way into the forest to its home beside the eagle hide. The chainsaw sculpture was created and given to South West Mull and Iona Development at the Bunessan Show in August 2016. For a few weeks it stayed behind in the show-field, beside Bunessan School, giving the children an opportunity to draw pictures for a competition.

John Clare, Forest Officer, judged the competition recently. The winners were Abigael Crosby (aged 9) and Quinn Soames (aged 4). Congratulations to both – what great pictures!

Drawing - Abigael  drawing - quinn  IMG_2289L

09/01/2017

 

13323472_10209805826486203_5481672084739882570_o looking up at the trees

Happy Birthday to us!

24th November 2016

It’s a year and a day since the communities of South West Mull and Iona took ownership of Tiroran Community Forest.

Since that day – 23rd November 2015 – we have already seen huge changes. Felling of the mature plantations began in April 2016; the landscape has been completely altered and we have started to bring in an income.

felled areas of forest (2)

Equally exciting has been seeing local people enjoying the forest; from those of all ages who came to our ownership celebration in June, to school children exploring and learning with Emily-the-ranger, to volunteers clearing around Tigh Ana and people learning about lichens at a recent Wild Mull event in November.

13332931_10209805805005666_6988374293206485287_n 13340328_10153623022696088_7906565249403025081_o img_1725

IMG_1646 Wild Mull 2

Alongside all this activity, the Tiroran Community Forest eagles, Iona and Fingal, raised Staffa, the chick named by children at Bunessan Primary School. The award-winning Mull Eagle Watch were kept busy with 1300 visitors coming to see these majestic birds.

Fingal

 

 

Logs

Tiroran Community Forest achieves UK Woodland Assurance Standard

South West Mull and Iona Development are proud to announce that Tiroran Community Forest has been assessed as fulfilling the requirements of the UK Woodland Assurance Standard (UKWAS), as part of the Tilhill Group Scheme.

The UK Woodland Assurance Scheme is an independent certification standard for verifying sustainable woodland management in the United Kingdom. It is consistent with Forestry Commission principles and criteria while reflecting local ecological, social and economic circumstances.

There are eight components of forest management that are assessed:

  1. Compliance with the law and conformance with the requirements of the certification standard;
  2. Management planning;
  3. Woodland design: creation, felling   and replanting;
  4. Operations;
  5. Protection and maintenance;
  6. Conservation and enhancement of  biodiversity;
  7. The community;
  8. Forestry   workforce.

The UKWAS does not provide a product label or chain of custody certification by itself but has been designed to fit into other labelling systems such as the FSC.

This achievement demonstrates that SWMID is committed to managing Tiroran Community Forest to the highest standards.

View Certificate

 

Fingal

PARKING ON THE FOREST ROAD CAN CAUSE DISTURBANCE TO EAGLES

It’s fantastic to see that Tiroran Community Forest’s sea eagle pair are nesting in the same place as last year. However, due to the felling of trees along the road, vehicles parking in passing places near the site and people getting out to take photographs are very visible to the eagles and likely to cause a disturbance to them. If they are disturbed this may affect their ability to successfully incubate eggs and raise chicks.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 makes it illegal to recklessly cause disturbance